ECU serves eastern NC’s HIV patients

East Carolina University’s Ryan White Program is the largest provider of HIV care in eastern North Carolina. In honor of World AIDS Day, the university will host Jacquelyn Clymore of the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services as its guest speaker at the East Carolina Heart Institute at 6 p.m. Friday, Dec. 1.

 

Interview line up in video

  • Dr. Nada Fadul – Ryan White Director, Infectious Disease Provider
  • Dr. Diane Campbell – RW Administrator, Treatment Adherence Director
  • Lawanda Todd – Linkage Retention and Community Health Worker Program Coordinator
  • Lasean Hutchinson – Social Worker -Community Health Worker Clinical Coordinator
  • Peter Williams – Consumer and Community Health Worker

 

Dr. Nada Fadul, Ryan White Director, Infectious Disease Provider.

 

Left to right, Dr. Diane Campbell, Ryan White Administrator, Treatment Adherence Director, Lasean Hutchinson, Social Worker, Community Health Worker Clinical Coordinator, Peter Williams, Consumer and Community Health Worker, Lawanda Todd, Linkage Retention and Community Health Worker Program Coordinator, and Dr. Nada Fadul, Ryan White Director, Infectious Disease Provider.

Left to right, Dr. Diane Campbell, Ryan White Administrator, Treatment Adherence Director, Lasean Hutchinson, Social Worker, Community Health Worker Clinical Coordinator, Peter Williams, Consumer and Community Health Worker, Lawanda Todd, Linkage Retention and Community Health Worker Program Coordinator, and Dr. Nada Fadul, Ryan White Director, Infectious Disease Provider.

 

Dr. Diane Campbell, Ryan White Administrator, Treatment Adherence Director

 

 

ECU serves eastern NC’s HIV patients

By Jules Norwood
ECU News Services

GREENVILLE, N.C. (11/30/2017) — East Carolina University’s Ryan White Program is the largest provider of HIV care in eastern North Carolina. In honor of World AIDS Day, the university will host Jacquelyn Clymore of the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services as its guest speaker at 6 p.m. Friday, Dec. 1.

ECU’s Ryan White Program is part of a federal effort to provide comprehensive care for patients diagnosed with HIV/AIDS and includes not only medical care but also a variety of services including assistance with transportation and housing.

“We serve about 1,500 HIV-infected patients in the region, and we provide a one-stop shop where patients can come in, get their medical care and see their doctor, but also we provide a multitude of services for these patients,” said Dr. Nada Fadul, director of the program. “Whatever the patient needs, we try to meet them where they are. … We try to make it a holistic experience where they can get all the care they need.”

Fadul explained that HIV is a chronic disease but one that is now manageable as long as patients have access to care and take their medication.

“The life expectancy for an HIV patient is very similar to somebody who does not have HIV,” she said. “The treatment has progressed so far that patients are able to take one pill once a day, and be able to manage their disease long-term without a lot of complications from the HIV itself.”

Making sure that patients have access to that life-supporting care, regardless of their health insurance situations or the challenges of serving rural areas, is the mission of the Ryan White Program.

The Ryan White Program at ECU:

  • Is the largest HIV clinic east of Interstate 95 in N.C.
  • Provides holistic HIV care that includes primary HIV medical care, mental health and substance abuse, case management and patient navigation services, transportation and medication assistance, and nutrition services on site. It also includes a referral network for medical, dental and vision.
  • In 2016, served more than 1,500 active HIV patients.
  • The service area includes 28 counties in eastern N.C.
  • The majority of the program’s clients are minority, underserved, and live at or below the federal poverty limit.
  • Receives Ryan White grant funding from the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services and the Health Resources and Services Administration.
  • Clients face unique challenges including transportation, housing, poverty, illiteracy and stigma.
  • Majority of clients (85 percent) are able to achieve control of their HIV or viral suppression, which has been shown to improve health outcomes and reduce the transmission of HIV to uninfected patients.
  • Viral suppression rate (85 percent) exceeds state and national averages.

 

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